Who wants to be a millionaire? I do: Postwar Australian wine, gendered culture and class

Julie McIntyre, John Germov

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    During an era of expanding social inclusion in the 1960s and 1970s, Australians increasingly drank more wine than at any previous time in colonial or national history. These wines were made in new styles and consumed in accordance with new habits across gender and class. The morphology of one of Australia’s most popular “introduction wines” of this period, Lindeman’s Ben Ean Moselle, reveals the emergence of new elements of national character. From being advertised to women in the late 1960s as “just right”, Ben Ean’s cultural messaging in the 1970s flirted with general appeal to men and women of the new middle class: “anywhere, anytime”. Then, by the mid-1980s, the ascendancy of this light, semi-sweet table wine was halted by the emergence of an elitism in which new professionals favoured consumer products of provenanced distinction. The arc of Ben Ean’s rise and fall symbolises an informalisation and subsequent reformalisation of values, conventions and identities during a time of social and cultural flux.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)65-84
    Number of pages20
    JournalJournal of Australian Studies
    Volume42
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 02 Jan 2018

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