Whose politics and which science

beyond the colonial in liberal political theory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines liberal political theory’s limits and possibilities in relation to indigenous self-determination. It shows that while the liberal tradition has provided theoretical rationale to the colonial project it is also equipped to rationalise a politics of substantive indigenous inclusion. The article introduces the recourses that exist within liberal theory for non-colonial interpretations of citizenship, democracy and sovereignty. It shows how these concepts may be interpreted to contribute to a liberal theory of indigeneity as a theory emphasising independent indigenous authority on the one hand and culturally contextualised and substantive participation in the politics of the state on the other.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396-406
Number of pages11
JournalAustralian Journal of Political Science
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jul 2019

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political theory
politics
science
recourse
self-determination
sovereignty
citizenship
inclusion
democracy
interpretation
participation

Cite this

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Whose politics and which science : beyond the colonial in liberal political theory. / O'Sullivan, Dominic.

In: Australian Journal of Political Science, Vol. 54, No. 3, 22.07.2019, p. 396-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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