Why do farmers partially adopt conservation farming practices? A sociological study of stubble retention in NSW and Victoria

Vaughan Higgins, Caroline Love, Anthony Dunn, Deirdre Lemerle

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Despite considerable investment in Australia and abroad to promote the benefits of conservation farming, rates of on-farm adoption in some regions have been slower than expected. Recent research suggests that this may be due to the preference by farmers for partial adoption of conservation farming practices. However, such research provides limited insights into why farmers may prefer partial adoption. This paper aims to address this issue by drawing upon qualitative data from a DAFF-funded project exploring stubble retention practices by grain growers in NSW and Victoria. Our study reveals that while growers recogni=se the significant benefits in retaining crop stubbles, there exist a range of constraints in moving towards full stubble retention. Growers seek to reconcile these benefits and constraints through partial adoption. They continue to selectively and reluctantly burn stubble as they recognise that moving towards full stubble retention would undermine their flexibility to manage biophysical and financial variability. This finding suggests that improving the uptake of stubble retention requires greater accommodation of growers’ existing practices, as well as recognition that selective burning may be complementary to growers retaining crop stubbles.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference
Subtitle of host publicationBuilding productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherAgronomy Australia
Pages1-4
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventAustralian Agronomy Conference - Wrest Point Convention Centre, Hobart, Australia
Duration: 21 Sep 201524 Sep 2015
http://2015.agronomyconference.com/

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Agronomy Conference
Abbreviated titleBuilding Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes
CountryAustralia
CityHobart
Period21/09/1524/09/15
Internet address

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Victoria (Australia)
stubble
growers
farming systems
farmers
crops
farms

Cite this

Higgins, V., Love, C., Dunn, A., & Lemerle, D. (2015). Why do farmers partially adopt conservation farming practices? A sociological study of stubble retention in NSW and Victoria. In 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes (pp. 1-4). Australia: Agronomy Australia.
Higgins, Vaughan ; Love, Caroline ; Dunn, Anthony ; Lemerle, Deirdre. / Why do farmers partially adopt conservation farming practices? A sociological study of stubble retention in NSW and Victoria. 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Australia : Agronomy Australia, 2015. pp. 1-4
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Higgins, V, Love, C, Dunn, A & Lemerle, D 2015, Why do farmers partially adopt conservation farming practices? A sociological study of stubble retention in NSW and Victoria. in 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Agronomy Australia, Australia, pp. 1-4, Australian Agronomy Conference, Hobart, Australia, 21/09/15.

Why do farmers partially adopt conservation farming practices? A sociological study of stubble retention in NSW and Victoria. / Higgins, Vaughan; Love, Caroline; Dunn, Anthony; Lemerle, Deirdre.

17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Australia : Agronomy Australia, 2015. p. 1-4.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Higgins V, Love C, Dunn A, Lemerle D. Why do farmers partially adopt conservation farming practices? A sociological study of stubble retention in NSW and Victoria. In 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Australia: Agronomy Australia. 2015. p. 1-4