Work and employment characteristics of deaf and hard-of-hearing adults

Jesper Dammeyer, Kathryn Crowe, Marc Marschark, Mark Rosica

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Studies have reported a higher level of unemployment among deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) adults compared to adults without hearing loss. However, little is known about factors explaining success in the labor market. This study presents the analysis of two data sets. The first was drawn from a survey of 804 DHH adults in Denmark. The second was a survey completed by 190 DHH adults with post-secondary qualification in the United States. In the Danish sample, among the spoken language users, higher ages, higher level of educational attainment, and no additional disabilities were associated with having a job. Among the sign language users, higher ages, higher level of educational attainment, earlier ages at hearing loss diagnosis, and not using cochlear implants were associated with having a job. In the US sample, male gender and better sign language skills were associated with having a job.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)386-395
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume24
Issue number4
Early online date07 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Oct 2019

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