Work, character and invisible virtue: Raimond Gaita's Romulus, my father in the context of his philosophy

Alexander Segal

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Abstract

The article argues that Raimond Gaita's memoir Romulus, My Father is itself marked by the incommensurability ' between a worldly Aristotelian ethic, emphasising mutually recognised virtue, and an otherworldly Socratic ethic for which virtue is not internally connected to recognition ' that Gaita invokes to describe his father's conduct. To this extent the memoir resists its author's attempt to conceptualise it, a resistance connected to its being so haunting.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-38
Number of pages20
JournalMeridian: The La Trobe University English Review
Volume19
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007

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