Work integrated learning in Vanuatu: Student perspectives

Brenda Delisle, Phillip Ebbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Non-traditional work integrated learning (WIL) experiences have become increasingly popular within undergraduate paramedicine programmes, partly because WIL is considered a valid pedagogy that contributes to the integration of clinical and supporting science capabilities. Aim: This paper builds upon previous WIL evaluation activities to determine whether an international WIL experience in Vanuatu provided a useful clinical and cultural learning experience for undergraduate paramedicine students. Methods: A 60-question survey was administered to participants, with questions chiefly focusing on clinical and cultural experiences during this overseas trip. Survey response frequencies have been presented and free-text responses have been used to provide further descriptive detail. Findings: This international WIL experience appears to have provided a very useful clinical and cultural learning experience for undergraduate paramedicine students. Discussion: Consideration should be given to further evaluation activities, and the development of a validated survey instrument, to more effectively measure the quality of non-traditional WIL programmes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-26
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Paramedic Practice
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Mar 2019

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